Too Dry Then Too Wet

As of late November all my fields were dry and hard since there had been but a brief rain in early October. The photo at right shows the amount of crop residue that was left from last year. Amongst that was a thick mat of medusahead, an invasive exotic grass that suppresses other seeds than its own. Though I’m trying not to disrupt the soil biology, this year I really needed to suppress that invasive grass with some soil disturbance.

 

Close to Thanksgiving I thought a window was opening with a little rain that would soften the soil so I bought organic fertilizer for a cash crop and seed for the cover crop. Then it started to rain and has kept on with only short breaks ever since. Now it is early January with no break in sight. I am hoping for some drying later this month or next that would allow me to plant all my fields. I must plant the cover crop one way or another to meet my USDA contract, but the cash crop is uncertain.

 

It’s clear that the weather patterns that prevailed over my first seven years of grain farming are no longer holding. This highly changeable weather is what climate warming models have predicted. It seems even more important to persist in this regenerative farming effort to see if I can create some resilience model that would grow crops no matter what the weather does.

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