Posts Tagged ‘tillage’

Conservation Tillage and Adventures with a Cantankerous Tractor

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

24 tons of compost being unloaded from a semi truckI’ve been trying for awhile to get compost and oyster shell lime for my fertilization program, as indicated by soil tests, and at the last moment the local fertilizer supplier for non-organic products agreed to rent me their spreader and the organic compost supplier was able to get me 48 tons of compost mixed with gypsum which was also needed in the fertilizer program.

As I was waiting for that to get delivered I got a window of dry weather in the middle of November so the ground was just barely dry enough to work.  I started on the acreage that would get the cover crop but it was evident that it would take four passes with a disc to get it smooth enough to plant.  (Editor: A disc is an implement with rows of steel discs that slice and turn over the soil from 3 to 6 inches deep that you pull behind the tractor.) At lunch on the third pass I shut off the tractor and when I went to start it diesel fuel squirted from the fuel system priming pump.  The rubber diaphragm had apparently gotten old and cracked…and it was a one-piece component that couldn’t be rebuilt.  I called the dealer—three days and $266 to get a replacement. I ordered it but watched the clouds build up for the next rain while the tractor sat in the field.

I got the tractor part and then had to wait 3 more days for the ground to dry again.  At that point the ten day forecast showed more rain on the way in a few days.  It seemed like I might have to choose between planting the cover crop and planting the grain but I gambled and decided to plant the cover crop.  It took me 15 minutes to put the new pump on the tractor and I was on my way.  The field was still kind of lumpy because it had been in pasture the previous year, so for the last pass I improvised a drag behind the disk.  I took two eight-foot forklift fork extensions and chained them to the back of the disc at angles so they wouldn’t plow up too much dirt [Editor: this is known as “ghetto farming”].  blue tractor and compostAfter some experimenting with angles they worked pretty well to break up clots and level the field.  Every farmer would like to have all the implements necessary but sometimes you have to make do with what you have.  I was on my last pass and the tractor died while I was driving.  It started again, went a hundred yards and did it again.  I reprimed the system with the priming pump, bled the injector lines to get any air out, and tried again.  Same thing.  In the end I concluded that the fuel pump in the tank had failed.  It was Saturday afternoon at 3 p.m. and the dealer was closed, so I was out of business for the weekend.

I commute to my fields so I eventually called a mechanic who lives nearby and had him find a new pump and install it for $500.  I was back in business by Tuesday morning, but the forecast was for more rain by Friday. I was just about done preparing for the cover crop so I went ahead and planted it and then started disking the field for the grain.  I had a hard time getting the stalks from the bell beans mixed into the soil and so went over the field twice, fearing that the grain drill (planter) wouldn’t cut through the trash.  At that point I could see that I really needed to start spreading compost.  Thursday morning I got the lime spreader and started trying to put on the three tons per acre that was the minimum.  Well, the compost was so wet it wouldn’t go out of the spreader consistently.  I had to stop about six times per load and climb up on the spreader with a fence post and knock it down.  By the time I got twenty tons on it was already noon.  I knew I wouldn’t get any lime spread if I didn’t let go of my goal of thirty tons of compost.  The lime I had was old and proved to be very difficult to load.  After spending thirty minutes loading, which should have taken ten, I found that the lime was even worse to spread than the compost.  It took me an hour to get that out of the spreader.  By that time it was 3:00 p.m.

I gave up on the lime and got my seed and started planting.  The soil condition wasn’t great—kind of ridged and too soft—but there wasn’t much choice.  I didn’t bother to save any leftover seed after I finished each variety of grain.  I just ran it out onto the ground.  I finally finished planting at 8:00 p.m by the light of the moon.  I’d never had any headlights and never needed them before, so I was lucky it was bright out.  I tarped the drill and tractor, put away the seed, and went home.  As it turned out it didn’t rain until late morning Friday so I could have spread more compost but there was no way of knowing.  The rain set in and never stopped for any length of time through December.  At this point there’s no way to know how the crop will turn out.  A few areas flooded and won’t grow anything but most of the crop is coming up pretty well, though the weeds are doing better.  There will be a lot of grain cleaning to do after harvest.

Moon photo courtesy of Zmtomako

The Science of Nature: the history of tillage, fertilizer, and soil tests

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

I have been doing further research on fertility and tillage, or working the soil.  My soil consultant is an advocate of mineral balancing for all minerals rather than just nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium.  Those three are the elements that get the primary focus in conventional farming.  A guy named William Albrecht did a lot of research back in the 1920’s and ’30’s on the subject before commercial fertilizers were common. Today, Neal Kinsey and Charles Walters are the most well-known authorities on the subject.  At that time the primary fertilizer was manure because most farms were small and diversified.  Most farmers didn’t didn’t do much soil testing to know what they were doing. Results were based on observation, but that is vulnerable to misunderstanding.

periodic tableAfter World War II chemical fertilizers became available and were cheap and easy to apply, so farmers and the fertilizer salesmen took to manipulating mostly those three: N, P, and K. Cheap and easily-handled fertilizer led to larger farms and concentration on commodity crops like corn and soybeans. Nitrogen particularly has been cheap because it is produced using petroleum but it’s getting more and more expensive as petroleum stocks decline.  The other downside of focusing on just those three is that the overall fertility and health of the soil has declined steadily.  Advocates of mineral balancing point out that minerals and trace elements interact in the soil and affect a plant’s ability to take up available nutrients.  Just having lots of applied nitrogen in the soil does not mean the plants can use it.  Excess nitrogen often leaches away, ending up in our waterways.  The same is true of phosphorus which promotes algae growth in rivers and streams and then leads to lack of dissolved oxygen.  The means by which minerals become changed in the soil is the relative amount so materials with electrically positive charges versus those with negative charges.  Sounds like voodoo, but it is basic soils science.

pile of soilSoil tests on my field this year showed that I had 2.8 % organic matter (not too bad); pH of 6.6 (which is a little acidic for grain); nitrogen of 76 ppm (not terrible); sulfates of 15; phosphate of 43; calcium (Ca} of 44.32; and magnesium (Mg) of 41.97.  The problem is that all the nitrogen isn’t available and that other elements are in reverse balance or in oversupply.  I need the sulfates to be 50, the phosphates 250, calcium 68, and magnesium 12.  That 68/12 relationship of the last two is the linchpin of Albrecht’s theory of mineral balancing.  Sometimes it’s stated as 65/15 but it means the same thing.  Calcium and Mg not only affect fertility but the texture of the soil, it’s ability to hold moisture, and what weeds will grow fastest.  I won’t bore you with all the calculations, but the prescription was four tons of compost to neutralize some of the Mg and Ca allow more uptake of nitrogen, two tons of lime to help balance the Ca, and one ton gypsum for the same reason. Organic matter is also important because it bonds with the positively-charged elements that I need for plant growth.  My soils are heavy clay so they have a pretty good ability to absorb nutrients in the right balance, they hold water a little too well, and they are gooey. The compost plus my heavy, leguminous cover crop add organic matter which decays to humus which has a negative charge and so bonds with those essential minerals with positive charges.  I have a problem with wild radish and field bindweed, both of which like low calcium soils, so those will be suppressed with mineral balancing, I hope.

mushrooms poking their heads out in the fieldI’m on a program now to grow a cover crop each fall on the field to be planted the next year to grain and then apply the compost, lime, and gypsum as soil testes indicate.  It’s a big first-year expense but should decline rapidly after that.  What has confounded me, though, is testimony from many sources, included Kinsey, that what mineral balancing does really is foster microbiological growth in the soil like nematodes, fungus, and bacteria.  These guys do the real work of converting sunlight to healthy plants.  Every time you chop up the soil with a disc, plow, or cultivator you disturb that biological life.  On the other hand, most grain crops are opportunists looking for some soil disturbance to get established.  Archaeological research indicates that the first farming took place in southern Turkey where nomadic people took to spreading seeds of wild grains on riverside soils after flooding in spring.  How do I balance those two needs?

Periodic table image courtesy of BlueRidgeKitties.
Soil photo courtesy of Scout Seventeen.